Employees experiencing their video conferencing system crashing

During this period where remote working has become more widely adopted, just under a third of employees have experienced their video conferencing system crash at least once during the past three weeks during an important meeting.

This research comes from, think tank Parliament Street, whose report ‘COVID-19: Isolation Nation’ shows that 31 per cent of workers have experienced their video conferencing system crash at least once in the last three weeks during a crucial meeting.

It also found that 27 per cent of bosses have not addressed their staff via video conference to update their staff on the COVID-19 crisis. A fifth (20 per cent) of companies have struggled with managing their payroll remotely.

 Over half (58 per cent) of companies have ordered new laptops, tablet computers, and mobiles to assist their staff working remotely. Still, a third (33 per cent) of them have done so without upgrading their security systems.

Worryingly, 34 per cent of business decision-makers have said they have received at least one mental health complaint from a member of their team in the last three weeks.

Also, it seems businesses are preparing to make sizable cuts, with 24 per cent saying they plan to give notice on lease and office rental agreement in the next few months.

Rod Flavell, CEO, FDM Group, a FTSE 250 IT training company, said:

It’s crucial that during tough times, CEOs lead from the front, keeping staff fully updated on the challenges facing the business and ensuring every employee feels valued, particularly when they are working remotely.

It’s not easy for large businesses to adapt to a completely new way of working, but it’s vital that leaders recognise the need to deliver training and team engagement initiatives online. In times of uncertainty, business leaders must show staff they recognise the anxieties they face, by keeping in regular video contact with every employee, whatever their managerial position or level of experience.

Independent research company, Censuswide, polled 200 senior business decision-makers to gather these results.