The opera house in Copenhagen. Constructive criticism is generally not something missing in the theatre, but in the workplace appraisals are not happening as often as they used to. Image: Henning Larsen Architects

The opera house in Copenhagen. Constructive criticism is generally not something missing in the theatre, but in the workplace appraisals are not happening as often as they used to. Image: Henning Larsen Architects

The theatre is not a place that wants for criticism. Reviews of performances come in thick and fast and when praise is due it often gushes, and in similar fashion, when something is judged to be terrible, the poison pours. Performers, in some cases, use reviews to hone and better their performance.

An appraisal is the employee’s version of an actor’s review, but unlike the review, appraisals in the workplace are becoming less common. They have traditionally always been a yearly occasion that often provokes dread in the hours and days before they occur.

Year long wait

New research released by Enterprise Study found that one-in-five staff employed for longer than a year said they have yet to experience their first annual review.

Of those employees who had been lucky enough to undergo an appraisal, 43 percent had to request it themselves, with 27 percent having to wait more than six months to have it after the request was made.

Postponed 

The report also investigated the reasons why appraisals were being postponed. Managers ‘being too busy’ was the principal reason (38 per cent), while only 57 percent of staff said their managers had opted to take the initiative and schedule an appraisal themselves.

It also became apparent in the study that some employers believe that if their company is small and informal then a structured appraisal process is not required. Many HR managers would, no doubt, disagree.