Tags: Law

Christina Morton: Pimlico Plumbers – Legal battle for workers’ rights continues at the Supreme Court

The announcement last week of Pimlico Plumbers’ decision to appeal to the Supreme Court over the employment status of one of its plumbers, Mr Smith, was widely expected, not least because of extensively publicised comments made by Pimlico Plumbers founder, Charlie Mullins, to the effect that the Court of Appeal reached the wrong decision in the case.

Acas urges employers to stamp out legal highs with disciplinary procedures

Legal highs imitate the effects of illegal drugs when consumed but are not actually illegal themselves, although some are thought to be just as dangerous and damaging. They are also known as psychoactive substances. Last year there were 129 deaths in England, Scotland and Wales due to legal highs.

Views on the European Court of Human Rights decision

With the rulings from the European Court of Human Rights on the four UK religious discrimination cases being widely reported, experts have responded by delivering their opinions on the verdicts. Alex Bearman, Partner, Russell Cooke LLP, said: “The significance of this judgment for employers is that it is now likely to be very difficult to…

UK whistleblowing law set to change

The Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill currently going through Parliament will change the UK’s whistleblowing legislation. The much-criticised loophole that allows disclosures made in relation to a breach of an employee’s own employment contract to become protected looks set to be closed. The Bill proposes to amend the current requirements so that disclosures must be…

Eversheds comment: European Court to review whether an inability to work full-time could be a disability

It is a number of years since the interpretation of “disability” under European law was last scrutinised closely, the issue having been reasonably well settled since 2006 when the European Court clarified that “sickness” is not “disability” for the purposes of the applicable Directive. However, a Danish case due to be heard by the Court…

Could new HSE scheme be dangerous?

Following an initial pilot, today sees the roll-out of the new Fee for Intervention (FFI) guidelines (1 October 2012), which are set to have significant financial implications for businesses. The highly debated FFI regime will allow the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) to recover its investigation costs from businesses. This fee will apply when a…

Mental Health Discrimination Bill moves step closer

A bill proposed by Tory backbencher and Croydon Central MP Gavin Barwell which would outlaw certain forms of mental health discrimination passed through its second reading in the House of Commons last Friday – 14 September 2012. If passed, the bill will repeal legislative provisions that can prevent people with mental health conditions from serving…

MPs urged to scrap discriminatory mental health laws

Three leading mental health organisations have joined forces to urge MPs to vote through legislation that will scrap outdated laws that discriminate against people with mental health problems. In a letter published in The Times, charities Rethink Mental Illness and Mind, along with the Royal College of Psychiatrists, are calling on MPs to back the…

MPs urged to scrap discriminatory mental health laws

Three leading mental health organisations have joined forces to urge MPs to vote through legislation today that will scrap outdated laws that discriminate against people with mental health problems. In a letter published in The Times, charities Rethink Mental Illness and Mind, along with the Royal College of Psychiatrists, are calling on MPs to back…

Contractor flees UK to avoid Tribunal payout

GMB, the union for engineering construction workers, is seeking changes to an EU Directive to ensure that 14 GMB members will be paid the £251,204.81 awarded to them earlier this year by an Employment Tribunal in Cardiff after German based contractor, Darmar, fled UK jurisdiction having failed to pay the award. GMB was successful in…