The top HR stories you may have missed this week

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The top HR stories you may have missed this week

Listed below are the biggest stories you may have missed this week.

UK is the eighth happiest workplace in the world

The UK is the eighth happiest workplace in the world, moving up from tenth in 2018 findings, with more than half of workers stating they are happy at work.

This is according to the Workplace Happiness survey set up by Engaging Works which was founded by Lord Mark Price, former government Minister of Trade and managing director of Waitrose.  The survey found that 58 per cent of the UK workforce is happy at work with 42 per cent being unhappy.

National Work Life Week: Is your company doing enough to ensure wellbeing?

This week (7th-11th October) is National Work Life Week, which aims to give employers and workers alike the opportunity to focus on wellbeing at work, with individuals in HR and charities calling for more flexible working to be implemented to boost wellbeing.

Lloyds to put an end to contractors due to IR35

Lloyds Banking Group has decided to either scrap contractors or force them in to umbrella companies, a move that has been dubbed as “bad for contractors and bad for business”.

The Association of Independent Professionals and the Self-Employed (IPSE) is warning other businesses to not follow suite and said this move “could not only harm the self-employed, but also long-term flexibility and productivity.”

World Mental Health Day: An important day for the workplace

The 10th October was World Mental Health Day, a day that promotes awareness of mental health in and out of the office, with many believing happy, healthy employees are the “backbone” of a successful company.

The advantages of this day for those in HR are clear as boosting mental health wellbeing in the office can lead to a rise in productivity, higher loyalty to the company and spur business growth.

UK employees feel their boss ‘does not care’ about their wellbeing

More than one third of UK workers feel their employer “does not care” about their mental or financial wellbeing.

This is according to research conducted by Parliament Street, a think tank, which found that 35 per cent of workers hold the opinion that their boss is not concerned regarding their wellbeing.

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