How can you accelerate your recruiting efforts in ways that best position your recruitment agency or HR team to engage and attract the best talent available during the Great Resignation?

Ian Knowlson tells Bill Banham in our latest podcast about recruiting in the post-pandemic age of the Great Resignation.

 

“THE LAST 10-15 YEARS IN THE RECRUITMENT INDUSTRY HAVE BEEN UNIQUE. BUT THERE ARE A NUMBER OF CONSTANTS THAT REMAIN THE SAME, EVEN THROUGHOUT RECESSIONS.”

– Ian Knowlson

Ian talks about how Neuro-Linguistic Programming (NLP) and management psychology can teach sales relationship skills. New recruitment agencies can use these skills to accelerate their growth.

Ian also talks of HR’s role in attracting talent. With today’s forecasts outlining that 20 percent of employees will be on the move on 2022, this is crucial.

 

“HR HAVE PROBABLY GOT ONE OF THE MOST IMPORTANT ROLES IN TODAY’S MARKET; THE EVOLUTION OF HR IS FASCINATING. HR MUST RESPOND TO THE CHANGING MARKET.”

– Ian Knowlson

At the moment, it is a candidate market. Demands for salaries are also higher than usual, perhaps to offset the cost-of-living crisis. In May 2022, the Bank of England forecast Britain’s economy would shrink by up to 1 percent in the final quarter of this year and also contract over 2023 as a whole.

 

Speaking of the future of the recruitment industry in the UK, Ian explains how the candidate’s market will slow down, and less people will be hiring.

 

“BUT, OVERALL, THE RECRUITMENT INDUSTRY IN THE UK IS ONE OF THE ONLY INDUSTRIES IN THE FINANCIAL CRISIS RECESSION THAT DIDN’T STOP GROWING.”

– Ian Knowlson

Part of it did, though, throughout the pandemic, outlines Ian. The hospitality sector was absolutely decimated. But, logistics did not have the same effect at all.

Ian also warns against residing to purely UK-centric locations, and highlights the benefits of remote working, which opens a wider, more disparate pool of talent; there is so much opportunity within a global talent pool. This will, in turn, avoid national downsides.

This is not to say, however that every sector can be operating remotely. Logistics is one example of this.

Automation may change this, argues Ian, and certain jobs may even disappear. For example, the bookkeeper is disappearing, if not already gone. Jobs are changing, emerging, and disappearing.

 

AUTOMATION WILL EXACERBATE THESE CHANGES THAT ARE ALREADY TAKING PLACE. IT IS CHANGE ON STEROIDS. WE ARE MOVING TO A WORLD OF TALENT WITHOUT BOUNDARIES.

– Ian Knowlson

We are seeing this movement away from the cities. Even with hybrid working, in the UK, we are certainly seeing this movement away from the cities. Creating a greater work-life balance is a top priority for employees post-pandemic.

 

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Editor at HRreview

Amelia Brand is the Editor for HRreview. With a master’s degree in Legal and Political Theory, her particular interests within HR include employment law, DE&I, wellbeing within the workplace. Prior to working with HRreview, Amelia was Sub-Editor of a magazine, and Editor of the Environmental Justice Project at the University College London, writing and overseeing articles into UCL’s weekly newsletter. Her previous academic work has focused on philosophy, politics and law, with a special focus on how artificial intelligence will feature in the future.