Employees calling out for flexible working

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Employees calling out for flexible working

The vast majority of workers are asking their bosses for flexible working hours as they feel they would be more productive if offered earlier finishing times.

According to Totaljobs, a huge 84 per cent of workers are asking their employers to consider flexible work, with 62 per cent stating they feel they would be more productive and get more done during the day if they could leave earlier.

This view seems to be held by middle managers as well as almost three quarters (73 per cent) think that their team would be more productive if they were offered an earlier finish.

More than a fifth (21 per cent) of workers think they are more productive during the summer months, so Totaljobs believe this is the best time to implement flexible working.

With 73 per cent of UK businesses stating they are finding it hard to find the right staff, flexible working could be the answer to this problem. As almost 80 per cent said they would be less likely to leave their current position if they were offered flexible working hours.

Despite this desire for flexible working, 44 per cent of workers said they would be worried about leaving early as they think their colleagues would judge them. More than two fifths (42 per cent) admitted to feeling guilty even when their manager has allowed them to leave work earlier.

Sweden has already implemented the ‘fika’ break which is often translated to “a coffee and cake break”. It is something most Swedes will take part in, as they will leave their office and go have a proper break and enjoy a coffee with friends. As so many UK workers are calling out for these types of working hours to be made part of a employees day, Totaljobs believes it may give the impression that the UK is falling behind the curve for a new age of employment.

Alexandra Sydney, group marketing director at Totaljobs said:

From baristas to business analysts, workers value flexibility, meaning companies have the opportunity to be more adaptable when it comes to working hours. All employees have the legal right to request flexible working as part of their contract – not just parents and carers.

Alongside this, simple incentives such as an early finish or giving employees a ‘flexible’ hour each week can make a significant difference to company culture, in terms of both wellbeing and team morale. Small perks like this can help to maintain happy, motivated staff that feel supported by management.

Research was conducted via the Totaljobs database to over 2,400 adults aged 18-65 between April and May 2019.

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  1. I think flexible working certainly ‘makes up’ for employment where salary expectations fall short. I am not sure this would work for the big boys of finance who expect half a pint of blood from their staff in exchange for a generous pay package.
    It would be interesting to see if the organizations who offer flexible working attract a certain demographic, those moving towards a slower pace of life at retirement or perhaps those who intend to go on future maternity/paternity leave.

    Once again it seems Sweden are ahead of the curve.

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