Only one in eight employers monitor their LGBT pay gap, according to a new TUC poll.

Also, only one in three companies who have LGBT policies have updated them in the last 12 months.

One in five (21%) workplaces told the TUC they do not have any policies in place to support their LGBT employees.Also, less than half (47%) of HR managers told the TUC that they have family policies (such as adoption, maternity, paternity and shared parental leave policies) that apply equally to LGBT workers.

 

Discrimination

The poll also found that only half (51%) of managers have a policy prohibiting discrimination, bullying and harassment against LGBT workers in their workplace.

Less than half (47%) said they have a clear reporting route for workers to raise concerns about discrimination, bullying and harassment against LGBT workers – even though one in seven (15%) managers have responded to bullying, harassment or discrimination against one or more LGBT workers.

 

Trans workers

Just one in four (25%) managers said that they have a policy setting out support for trans (including non-binary) workers who wish to transition to live as another gender.

  

LGBT pay gap 

The most recent research suggests there is a 16 percent LGBT pay gap, meaning LGBT workers are effectively paid £6,703 less per year.

But the new poll revealed that only one in eight (13%) of the workplaces the TUC spoke to currently monitor the pay gap between LGBT workers‘ pay and non-LGBT workers’ pay.

So, the TUC says it is unsurprising that only one in five (20%) managers said that they have a LGBT action plan to address inequalities identified through monitoring exercises.

TUC General Secretary Frances O’Grady said: “Lesbian, gay, bi and trans people deserve to feel safe and to be respected at work.

“But it’s shocking so many workplaces don’t have specific policies in place to support their LGBT staff.

“Without these policies, too many LGBT workers experience bullying, harassment and discrimination at work.

“A step change is long overdue. Ministers must introduce a new duty on employers to protect all workers from harassment by customers and clients.

“And government should also introduce a statutory requirement for large employers to report on their LGBT pay gaps – in the same way they do their gender pay gaps – with action plans detailing how bosses will address these inequalities.”

 

Government action needed 

The TUC is calling on the government to introduce a range of measures to support LGBT people at work, including:

  1. LGBT pay gap reporting: Ministers should introduce a statutory requirement for large employers to report their LGBT pay gaps and employment rates – with regular monitoring and action plans detailing how employers will address these inequalities. Polling suggests that the LGBT pay gap is around 16 percent.
  2. Protection from workplace bullying and harassment: The government must consult with unions on a strategy to make sure workplaces are safe for all LGBT people. As a minimum, the government should introduce a new duty on employers to protect workers from harassment by customers and clients.

 

 

 

 

 

Editor at HRreview

Amelia Brand is the Editor for HRreview. With a master’s degree in Legal and Political Theory, her particular interests within HR include employment law, DE&I, wellbeing within the workplace. Prior to working with HRreview, Amelia was Sub-Editor of a magazine, and Editor of the Environmental Justice Project at the University College London, writing and overseeing articles into UCL’s weekly newsletter. Her previous academic work has focused on philosophy, politics and law, with a special focus on how artificial intelligence will feature in the future.