Firms to boost workplace inclusion by bringing more youths into their company

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youngerworkCompanies could be considering ways to boost workplace inclusion by increasing the number of young people they offer jobs to.

The latest youth unemployment data for the UK shows almost a million young people around the country are currently out of work, with 21.2 per cent overall seeking a job.

Unemployment overall rose by 7,000 to 2.52 million between November 2012 and January 2013, the release of official figures showed, but it seems young people are being badly hit by the slow economic recovery from the global financial slowdown.

Apprenticeships are one of the ways many firms are looking to increase the number of young people on their payrolls, as this gives youths money in their pocket as well as a chance to develop their skills and perhaps earn a full-time role at the end.

Martina Milburn, chief executive of the Prince’s Trust, told BBC News that the charity will be looking to work with the government on measures to reduce youth unemployment.

Adecco is another of the organisations to be taking steps in a bid to tackle the issue. Chief executive officer at the company Patrick de Maeseneire told the Global Recruiter that youth unemployment is “economically and morally unacceptable” and claimed the hopes and dreams of a whole generation are being swept away.

The body has therefore launched the Adecco Way to Work programme, which sees its employees offer young people free career guidance and training to boost their employability. It will be tackling youth unemployment in countries such as Mexico, Argentina and Colombia, Singapore, South Korea and Thailand, as well as in the UK, through the scheme.

Writing for the Huffington Post, chair of the Take Charge movement advisory panel and former director-general of the British Chambers of Commerce David Frost stated the impact of the rising levels of youth unemployment is arguably the largest issue facing the UK at the moment.

“To survive and thrive in our economy, young people need the skills and knowledge to be financially capable, enterprise and employable,” he said, adding Take Charge aims to make this a reality through the collective strength, experience and knowledge of charities in the UK.

Training schemes for young people are one of the ways firms can boost their workplace inclusion by bringing more youths into their company.

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