Millennial women are the most pessimistic about the rate of change, believing that it will take 22 years for equality to be achieved.

Millennial women are the most pessimistic about the rate of change, believing that it will take 22 years for equality to be achieved.

Gender equality is still a generation, or 17 years away, as research suggests women under 35 are most pessimistic about the time needed for change.

The gender pay gap is a re-occuring battle, and this latest research with undoubtedly reignite an age-old concern. With leading companies such as Twitter constantly in the limelight for their diversity decisions in the workplace, and recent research revealing that women are paid 35 percent less than men, it is safe to say that the argument for gender pay gap concerns is strong.

According to a report created by Right Management, which is part of the ManpowerGroup, millennial women are the most pessimistic about the rate of change, believing that it will take 22 years for equality to be achieved.

“Can we really afford to wait another generation until women have the same opportunities in the workplace as men?” said Ian Symes, general manager of Right Management UK & Ireland.

“Millennials have the most potential to drive new behaviours around the treatment of women in the workplace but for them to feel inspired enough to act, they need to know a level playing field is within reach,” he added.

By contrast, men from the millennial generation believe that a level playing field could be a reality in 14 years time.

Despite this, the research also found that millennials, which refers to those aged 34 and under, believe that they are the generation that will make equality happen.

“Eradicating the gender pay gap should be a priority for every UK business and the announcement of requiring transparency of paid bonuses is a welcome first step to tackling this challenge on a business front. Through using the right tools, employee performance can be tracked and analysed and highlight where gaps in the business may lie and how they can be bridged. The employees sales ability would be noticed and rewarded, irrespective of gender,” said Tom Castley, Vice President of Xactly EMEA.

“With women making less money across the spectrum regardless of their career paths, it’s time for every employer to take a holistic look at their compensation model to ensure there are no gender pay gaps. Every organisation can benefit from a thorough analysis of its compensation plan. By making a fair and accurate plan, organisations ensure that the workforce is fully enabled to drive the businesses to success. This not only creates a culture of productive employees, but can reduce the gender pay gap; hopefully bringing us closer to workplace equality that bit sooner.”