Do women CEOs run large firms more effectively than men?

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New research by Mintigo has discovered that women at the top of large organisations produce more profitable results than male CEOs.

Spanning millions of companies in the US with over 100 staff or more than $50 million in revenue, the results show that male CEOs achieve higher revenue per worker in firms that employ up to 1,000 people.

Put them in charge of a company with 1000+ employees though, and female CEOs were found to generate 18 percent higher revenue per employee than male CEOs.

Related: Chris Goward: What’s driving gender and ethnic diversity in the boardroom?

“Mintigo mined the web and used sophisticated predictive algorithms to gather robust data on millions of companies,” the report stated.

“Unfortunately, the analysis shows that only 17% of companies have female CEOs.”

The research also investigated leadership styles, finding that firms with female CEOs had more effective marketing, event planning and a greater online presence. Female CEOs tended to inhabit the business-to-consumer space, with male CEOs more recurrent in B2B.

“You are more likely to find a female CEO in healthcare and non-profit, while more likely to find men in manufacturing and construction,” the report stated.

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2 Comments - Write a Comment

  1. This shouldn’t be positioned as a gender issue, but a behaviours issue. I’d like to know the characteristics of the high performing CEOs. Until the conversation shifts to competencies and behaviours, articles like this just propagate and accentuate the gender divide.

  2. It certainly works for me/us in our large, well-known manufacturing/engineering company – and, as a matter of interest, she is neither ‘L’, ‘G’, ‘B’ or ‘T’ (perish the thought!).

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